AOMORI

Meet the locals. Feel the energy of this land, where they were born and raised. Breathe fresh air and be in the Idyllic scenery, listen to the sound of their chatting.
The culture born here, the tradition born here. You will find the story behind it.

What is AOMORI

AOMORI is in the northernmost part of Japan, and is known as snow country.
The place abounds in the sort of beauty typical of rural Japan such as pastoral landscapes and rolling mountains.
On the other hand, the winter season is a harsh natural environment.

A man said, “ I want to make something crazy.” It is the Tsugaru way.
Their passion is produced by this tranquil and dramatic environment.

Aomori is in the northernmost part of Japan, and is known as snow country.
The place abounds in the sort of beauty typical of rural Japan such as pastoral landscapes and rolling mountains.
 On the other hand,the winter season is a harsh natural environment.

A man said, “ I want to make something crazy.” It is the Tsugaru way.
Their passion is produced by this tranquil and dramatic environment.

What is AOMORI

Season

Travel AOMORI is designed for those who delight in the lovely discovery while indulging mind and body in beautiful nature and unique cultures through the four seasons. Let’s visit AOMORI all the time!

Spring

Explore cherry blossom viewing spots, unparalleled in volume and beauty. And also apple blossoms, the sparkle of paddy fields filled with water. After a long and cold winter, the splendid blossoms announce the arrival of spring.

Summer

Feel the cool breeze in the mountains. Enjoy hiking in the deep green of virgin beech forests. And the passionate festivities, especially the Nebuta Festival, rejuvenate the human spirit. It is Japan’s foremost splendid and majestic moment.

Autumn

It is time for the harvest season. The scenery of paddy fields rippled like a golden carpet. And apple fields cover the land as far as the eye can see. The trees change to yellow, orange and red. Lakes and Japanese garden ponds peculiar to AOMORI with fiery autumn leaves reflecting on the surface.

Winter

The world wrapped in white as snow covers the towns and mountains. AOMORI is magical in winter. Enjoy skiing and snowboarding on pristine powder snow, relax your body and soul in hot springs. Have a special experience that can only be experienced in snow country.

Meet AOMORI

The people are proud artisans who make no compromise in pursuit of the best quality of work. Set out on a journey to explore the heart and soul of AOMORI.

Tsugaru Ujoyaki potter
Tsugaru traditional Kumiko
Travel inspiration:Unique experiences
Travel AOMORI

ITINERARY

Enjoy playing with nature and immersing yourself in the culture of the people who live there. Experience the best part of nature with all five senses, the excitement of interacting with colorful cultures.

coming soon...

Experience Tsugaru’s tradition and life-style
Nature connection activities in Towada

What is “Kogin embroidery”?

Kogin embroidery is traditional needlework originally from Aomori. Its stylish designs feature beautiful diamond patterns. Kogin embroidery dates back to the Edo period (1603-1867). In the region the farmers were not allowed to wear cotton, so they lived in clothes of coarse linen. However the region has a harsh, frigid winter. Coarse linen provides little warmth, and it also frays when shouldering heavy baskets during farm work. The women began to sew with thread into coarse hemp clothes to reinforce them and hold in warmth. Eventually Kogin embroidery was born. After the period, the wearing of cotton was permitted and embroidering dyed indigo cloth with white cotton thread became mainstream. They began competing to draw the most beautiful patterns. It is said that there were over 300 kinds of patterns. Over the years, various geometric patterns passed down the generations. Kogin embroidery is beauty brought to life by the living wisdom of the women of Japan’s snow country.

Ms Yoko Sato

Ms. Sato carries her favorite needle and thread even when she is out of the house, and even for a short time, she embroiders Kogin embroidery. Kogin embroidery takes on a beautiful shape little by little as time passes. She said “Predecessors took care about the end of the thread, and the reversed pattern is also beautiful! Great work even from behind.”

What is “Tsugaru traditional Kumiko”?

The delicate combination of linear parts to create 3D forms with a dream-like beauty. Beginning as an artform in the 8th century and remaining an active form of carpentry in Japan to this day, Kumiko is a uniquely Japanese style of woodwork.The process involves interconnecting carved wooden pieces together, in intricate patterns, to create a finished panel without the use of glue, nails, or any other external tools. Tsugaru traditional Kumiko is characterized by three-dimensional and complex geometric patterns depicted by carving grooves, holes, and tenons on finely sawed wood and combining numerous linear parts.

Mr Masami Saito

Mr Saito, who is a Tsugaru traditional Kumiko’s craftsman in Aomori, continues to explore potential new modes of expression. He believes it is necessary to evolve with the times. So he creates a wide range of products, such as interior decorations, paper lamps, partitioning screens, folding screens, spherical lampshades, and bags. He said “I want to craft unique pieces.” So he doesn’t want to make the same things repeatedly. That is why, he always steps to the next unique work.

What is “Tsugaru Ujoyaki pottery”?

On objects created by the potter using only materials existing in nature, melted ash of the Japanese red pine leaves mystic designs.That’s Tsugaru Ujoyaki pottery.

Mr Rikei Imai

He was impressed by the Tokoname ware vase that was burned during the Heian period, and began pottery at the age of 26. Here in this land, Mr Imai pursues the ultimate expression of glaze without glaze,produced by the interaction of nature and humans. After nurturing a high-temperature flame in the kiln, the wood turns to ash and falls onto the works like snow. As the temperature in the kiln goes even higher, the ash melts into a vitreous entity. He has been into the process. He feels that I am depicting Earth’s creation. He said, “I want to make something crazy.” He aims to produce something intense. He said quietly, “Even imperfect pieces are treated as works of art.” “Even if only a fragment remains, I want it to be a work of art.” He is producing works with unwavering creativity.